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The Barrow Cadbury Trust and Lloyds Bank Foundation invite proposals to conduct an independent evaluation. We are seeking an evaluation partner to deliver a summative evaluation of Q-SEED, a new pilot leadership programme for Black and Global Majority (BGM) leaders in the criminal justice system. We seek an evaluation consultant, agency or partnership who will work with our appointed provider.

The overarching objective of the programme is to challenge and change the criminal justice system, from policy through to service design and delivery, through building leadership capabilities. The pilot programme will have four core elements:

  • Personal development and wellbeing
  • Networking
  • Systems thinking and policy development and influencing
  • Leadership competencies and organisational development

The role of the evaluator will be to conduct a summative evaluation on the impact of the programme for participants and the wider criminal justice sector.

A budget of £25,000 is available for the evaluation.

Pilot programme outputs

The programme will recruit up to 20 Black and Global Majority leaders in the criminal justice system, including both people in current leadership roles and emerging leaders.

The training methodology will focus on experiential learning; group facilitation; action planning; coaching & mentoring both in-person and virtual; expert-led classes; shadowing opportunities and access to on-line learning; and research analysis.

We anticipate the successful bidder to provide:

  • An evaluation workplan or inception report
  • Co-produced monitoring, evaluation and learning framework for the
    programme, including any associated measurement tools
  • A short interim report during the delivery of the pilot to capture
    emerging outcomes
  • A final impact report on the programme (no more than 30 pages)
  • A workshop to share final findings on the impact of the programme
    with the programme provider, participants and funders
  • A standalone executive summary to a standard that can be published
    externally

Outcomes and objectives

Through this programme the funders and delivery partners are seeking to support people and charities to positively influence the criminal justice system.

  1. Support the design of the evaluation and monitoring framework for the programme to support the learning of the provider and funders during delivery.
  2. Robustly and impartially assesses the impact of the pilot programme against its objectives once it has concluded and a minimum of six months afterwards.
  3. Make recommendations for the further development and roll out of leadership programmes as a route to long-term social change in the criminal justice sector.
Essential skills and knowledge

  • Proven experience in conducting summative social impact evaluations
  • Expertise in developing monitoring, evaluation and learning frameworks
  • Lived experience and understanding of working with Black and Global
    Majority communities
  • Ability to clearly communicate accessible findings and
    recommendations to a variety of audiences and stakeholders, i.e.
    without using jargon

Your values

Your values must align with the programme, including those of the consortia delivering the programme, and it is essential that you understand and display a commitment to the following values and characteristics.

  • Anti-racist practice
  • Adaptability
  • Flexibility
  • Empowering of others
  • Cultural awareness
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Empathy
  • Integrity and honesty
  • Passion for social change
  • An awareness of and ability to respond to issues of intersectionality
Application process
Proposals should be submitted by emailing [email protected] with the title:
[Your organisation name]: Evaluation proposal for Criminal Justice Leadership Programme
By 5pm, 11 March 2024.

Interviews will be held on 26 March 2024.

Read the full tender.

T2A Chair Leroy Logan MBE reflects on the findings of the Alliance for Youth Justice’s (AYJ) briefing paper on the transition from the youth to adult justice system – focusing on the experiences of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic young people.

A Black person with a grey beard, blue suit, and glasses

A spotlight on racial disparities

As the briefing suggests, young people who turn 18 while in contact with the justice system face a steep cliff edge. Studies show that this age is a crucial turning point where many young people begin to desist from crime with the right support and interventions. But rather than take advantage of this capacity for change, statutory services fall away. For Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic young people, the transition to the adult justice system can be even more challenging. 

This latest briefing from AYJ has cast a harsh spotlight on the failings of our justice system to address the racial disparities that have blighted many young people’s lives. From an early age, many Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic young people find themselves associated with criminal stereotypes. Labelling young people in this way is incredibly damaging, eroding self-belief and making it harder to move towards a pro-social identity. Once Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic children enter the justice system, they are less likely to be diverted, more likely to receive harsher sentences, and more likely to be sent to custody, sentenced or on remand, compared to white children. 

“Guilty before proven innocent… you kind of learn authority figures don’t actually care.” – (Young person) 

This can create a huge gulf in understanding and trust between Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic young adults and the professionals working in the system.  Sadly, these findings confirm what many of us working in the sector already expected. That’s why I welcome AYJ drilling down into the causes of this crisis, and what needs to change to deliver better outcomes. Too often, we focus solely on what’s not working and forget that we must create a roadmap for the future we wish to see. 

An over-stretched and under-resourced system

It’s clear that even with a diverse workforce, culturally competent training, and the best will in the world, the probation service is struggling to keep its head above water.  A professional quoted in the briefing had this to say: “Record levels of staff sickness, extended sick leave, people fleeing the service in droves – that then exacerbates every other issue we have. We can’t be ambitious, we can’t be progressive, we can’t make many changes if you’re barely able to keep the regime running.” There are many admirable professionals working in the system who want to do better for young adults, but they don’t have the time, resources, or support to implement creative approaches.  Without sufficient investment, the system can barely meet young adults’ basic needs – let alone support them to take steps towards a more positive future.  

Collaboration with the VCSE sector

In this depressing climate, the work of voluntary and community organisations has become even more vital.  Specialist Black and Ethnic Minority-led organisations have an intimate understanding of the communities Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic young people come from and how their experiences inform their behaviour and identity. As the research highlights, these grassroots organisations are well placed to provide nuanced support that recognises these young people’s overlapping needs – support that statutory services would struggle to provide. 

These organisations are also more likely to have lived experience embedded in their staff and support services, meaning they can provide peer mentoring and positive role models – both of which are essential components in facilitating the shift towards a pro-social identity 

Ring-fenced funding to commission specialist organisations

I believe that we could take this further by developing a model where specialist Black and Minority-Ethnic led grassroots organisations are commissioned to operate services in their communities. Funding would be ring fenced for these local organisations who have the expertise to deliver the best outcomes.  This model could be supported by local roundtables where information and knowledge are shared regularly so that young adults can access support from multiple agencies. Meeting in this way will also help criminal justice agencies better understand how these organisations are well placed to support young adults. Having buy in from all partners will be vital to the success of this model. 

The Newham Transition to Adulthood Hub is a great example of how this approach can work in practice. They have a wide variety of services in one space, so staff can consult each other on individual cases and referrals to different services are much easier and more efficient. Regular spotlight sessions are held where different teams share their expertise and explain how their services can benefit young adults.  

Grassroots organisations excluded from funding opportunities

Unfortunately, the AYJ’s report found that organisations with strong community links and knowledge are effectively excluded from funding opportunities. They lack the resources to compete with larger organisations who can meet the excessive commissioning processes and compliance requirements demanded by the Ministry of Justice and HMPPS.  However, many of these larger organisations lack the knowledge and cultural competence to successfully deliver these services. Shockingly, they often sub-contract their services at a lower rate to the very grassroots organisations that have been denied a place at the table. 

It is crucial that the Ministry of Justice and HMPPS immediately reform VCS funding allocation so that specialist Black and Minority-Ethnic led grassroots organisations can build the capacity of their services – ensuring every young person receives age-appropriate, trauma-informed, culturally competent services that reflect their entire lived experience. 

Three and a half years after the murder of George Floyd, and despite considerable attention in civil society to racism and anti-racism, too little has changed in day-to-day experience for Black and Minoritised Ethnic people in mainstream civil society according to the findings of a new report, ‘Warm Words, Cold Comfort: UK civil society’s ongoing racism problem’ released today by ACEVO and Voice4Change England and authored by Dr. Sanjiv Lingayah, co creator of the Home Truths 2 programme.

This report is informed by a survey of over 130 Black and Minoritised Ethnic people working in mainstream civil society and is the first major output of the Home Truths 2 programme, designed to challenge and support mainstream UK civil society to take serious practical action on anti-racism and race equity. The insights and experiences reflected in this report will guide the programme’s work to build a sector that takes meaningful action on anti-racism and race equity.

The report shows that while there are some signs that organisations are signalling that they are against racism, they are not taking practical steps to change experiences. Key findings shed light on urgent challenges and hope for progress.  The report reveals some alarming realities:

  • 77% of respondents have experienced or witnessed racism within civil society within the last five years;
  • 59% doubt the commitment of civil society leaders to combat racism effectively;
  • 68% of respondents have felt the need to ‘tone down’ their behaviour or to be on their ‘best behaviour’ in order to fit into mainstream civil society.

Amid these negative experiences and perspectives, the report also highlights that there is hope.

  • 46% of contributors feel that anti-racism/race equity is taken seriously in their organisation; and
  • 65% are hopeful that progress will be made on anti-racism/race equity in the organisation in which they work.

Whether this hope is well founded will largely depend on the courage and commitment of mainstream civil society leaders and organisations to undertake the hard emotional and practical labour that of moving towards anti-racism and race equity. If there is enough willingness, transformation is possible. If not, then mainstream civil society will be deemed to have offered warm words on racism, but these words will offer cold comfort and count for little.

A call for transformative change

The full report offers comprehensive insights and offers a textured account of the realities of working towards race equity and anti-racism in mainstream UK civil society more than three years on from the murder of George Floyd and the publication of the first Home Truths
report.

The report kicks off a programme of wider activities for The Home Truths 2 over the next 18 months . The “Further, Faster” programme designed to support chief executives and senior leaders already active in anti-racism and race equity practice within their organisations to make rapid and meaningful progress, will open for applications in the new year. For those ready to make anti-racism and race equity core to their organisation’s mission and take action, register your interest to be kept informed and be the first to know when applications are open.

About the survey

The survey ran online from 17 July 2023 to 12 October 2023 and was open to Black and Minoritised Ethnic people with recent or current experience of working in UK mainstream civil society. It gathered a total of 139 valid responses. At the time of survey completion, 129 out of the 139 contributors were working in civil society – the vast majority as employees.

The largest representation in the survey was of people working in organisations with annual income of between £1 million and £5 million. Other respondents were fairly evenly distributed, including between organisations with annual income of £100,000 or less and £50 million or more. It is noted that discrimination faced by Black and Minoritised Ethnic people may be compounded by multiple factors in addition to their ‘race.’ Most survey respondents fell into intersectional categories, as a result of which they may be subject to discrimination on multiple grounds.

About Home Truths 2

Home Truths 2 is a programme of work from ACEVO and Voice4Change England designed to challenge and support mainstream UK civil society to take serious practical action on anti-racism and race equity. Over the course of the next 18 months, Home Truths 2 will engage stakeholders from across civil society, including senior leaders, staff and those working within and alongside civil society organisations in a targeted practical programme of activity. Home Truths 2 will offer practical resources and guidance to mainstream civil society in general. The work includes approaches to calculating and remedying ethnic pay disparities, integrating race equity into the core mission and bringing senior leaders together to drive forward their anti-racist and race equity practice.

The elements of the programme will contribute to converting the positive words from mainstream civil society on anti-racism and race equity into practical and powerful change.

The Barrow Cadbury Trust and Lloyds Bank Foundation invite proposals to conduct an independent evaluation. We are seeking an evaluation partner to deliver a formative and summative evaluation of a new pilot leadership programme for Black and Global Majority (BGM) leaders in the criminal justice system. We seek an evaluation consultant, agency or partnership who will work with our appointed provider.

The overarching objective of the programme is to challenge and change the criminal justice system, from policy through to service design and delivery, through building leadership capabilities. The pilot programme will have four core elements:

  • Personal development and wellbeing
  • Networking
  • Systems thinking and policy development and influencing
  • Leadership competencies and organisational development

The role of the evaluator will be to conduct a formative and summative evaluation on the impact of the programme for participants and the wider criminal justice sector.

A budget of £25,000 is available for the evaluation.

Pilot programme outputs

The programme will recruit up to 20 Black and Global Majority leaders in the criminal justice system, including both people in current leadership roles and emerging leaders.

The training methodology will focus on experiential learning; group facilitation; action planning; coaching & mentoring both in-person and virtual; expert-led classes; shadowing opportunities and access to on-line learning; and research analysis.

We anticipate the successful bidder to provide:

  • Co-produced monitoring, evaluation and learning framework for the programme, including any associated measurement tools.
  • A final impact report on the programme (no more than 30 pages).
  • A workshop to share final findings on the impact of the programme with the programme provider, participants and funders.
  • A standalone executive summary to a standard that can be published externally.

Outcomes and objectives

Through this programme the funders and delivery partners are seeking to support people and charities to positively influence the criminal justice system.

  1. Support the design of the evaluation and monitoring framework for the programme to support the learning of the provider and funders during delivery.
  2. Robustly and impartially assesses the impact of the pilot programme against its objectives once it has concluded and a minimum of six months afterwards.
  3. Make recommendations for the further development and roll out of leadership programmes as a route to long-term social change in the criminal justice sector.

Essential skills and knowledge

  • Sound and proven experience in conducting formative and process evaluation.
  • Sound and proven experience in conducting summative social impact evaluation.
  • Expertise in monitoring, evaluation and learning in leadership development programmes.
  • Knowledge and expertise on leadership skills and development.
  • Knowledge and experience of working with Black and Global Majority communities.
  • Knowledge of participatory evaluation methods.
  • Ability to clearly communicate accessible findings and recommendations to a variety of audiences and stakeholders, i.e.
    without using jargon.

Your values

Your values must align with the programme, including those of the consortia delivering the programme, and it is essential that you understand and display a commitment to the following values and characteristics.

  • Anti-racist practice
  • Adaptability
  • Flexibility
  • Empowering of others
  • Cultural awareness
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Empathy
  • Integrity and honesty
  • Passion for social change
  • An awareness of and ability to respond to issues of intersectionality

Application process

Proposals should be submitted by emailing [email protected] with the title:
[Your organisation name]: Evaluation proposal for Criminal Justice Leadership Programme

By 14 December 2023, 5pm

Interviews will be held on Wednesday 17 January 2024.

Read the tender

In July 2020, in response to the killing of George Floyd and an increasing global dialogue about racial justice and institutional racism, Barrow Cadbury Trust posted a blog by our chair, Erica Cadbury, on the findings of some historical research into the role of the Cadbury company (the profits from which form a part of the current endowment invested to fund our work) in slavery or related exploitation.  Whilst the establishment of the company post-dated the abolition of slavery in this country in 1833, enquiries revealed involvement in indentured labour on Sao Tome and Principe cocoa plantations.  You can read the blog here.   

 Since July 2020 we have continued to reflect on the legacy of colonialism and labour exploitation, as part of the origins of our endowment and we are planning to pursue this further over the coming months.  However, being transparent about the past is not enough, we must ask ourselves “what next?”  Therefore, as an organisation focused on social and racial justice, we will be looking at how that knowledge will impact on our work, on the groups and individuals we work with, and on broader society.   

Working on racial justice has been core to the Trust’s work for a number of decades, so we are pleased to take this opportunity to examine and develop our approach, strategy, and activities, in order to play as useful a part as possible in the ongoing conversations and actions around addressing structural racism.  In particular, we will integrate this into our strategic review, which begins in April.  We anticipate that it will involve looking closely at our governance, the diversity of our board of trustees and how we consult our stakeholders when taking strategic decisions.    It will also mean taking a hard look at all areas of our work, especially those where racial justice has featured insufficiently.  

A statement about the progress of these discussions and our next steps will be published on our website in due course.  Meanwhile, we stand in solidarity with all minoritised people and are committed to our own continuous improvement.   

Erica Cadbury (Chair) and Sara Llewellin (Chief Executive) on behalf of the Barrow Cadbury Trust Board and staff team.   

This blog on racial justice in the VCS comes from Jeremy Crook OBE, Chief Executive of BTEG.  It was planned as one of our 2020 centenary blogs.  December’s Covid-related events pushed it into January – but it’s much too good to miss. 

The Trust has had a strong involvement in racial justice issues over many decades.  But this is a challenge to our own governance and management, and we are very aware that our board and senior management team are not sufficiently racially diverse.  In a majority family governed foundation, racial diversity is an issue, and working with a  small staff team we can only make new appointments when posts become vacant.  The board has not been monochrome over the past five years and  we are committed to increasing our Black and Minority Ethnic membership in the coming year.  This has been written into our performance objectives as a Chair and a Chief Executive and we are currently working on it.
Erica Cadbury and Sara Llewellin
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Black Training and Enterprise Group (BTEG) was set up 30 years ago. We focus on helping children and young people succeed in education, employment and minimising their involvement in the criminal justice system. As one of the longest serving chief executives of a national charity, I want to reflect on how the conversation on race equality has changed in the voluntary and community sector (VCS).

I joined the VCS in the early 1980’s by volunteering for the Afro-Caribbean Youth Council, a charity in Walsall. The driver for its creation was social exclusion of black youth from mainstream organisations, school exclusions, lower educational attainment, youth unemployment, access to housing and police racism.

Race equality always felt like a peripheral issue in the VCS and was only supported by a handful of charitable trusts. The VCS was content to support race inequality initiatives if it did not reduce the resources available to the mainstream sector.

Last year an explosion of global anger was ignited by the killing of George Floyd in broad daylight on a public street by a group of police officers. Many parts of the world were awakened to how people of African origin are treated by the police, at work, on the streets, in the media, in the justice and political systems. The Black Lives Matter movement gave voice to more black people, many of whom have suffered in silence and/or been under-valued in the workplace for many years.

Reinvigorated scrutiny of the VCS highlighted that the presence of black and Asian people at senior levels in the VCS is extremely poor. There are some black and Asian individuals leading large charities and charitable trusts but, overall, their representation at senior levels is inadequate. According to ACEVO only 3% of charity CEOs were from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds (2017).

It has also brought into focus what it means to be anti-racist in the VCS. Unacceptably, we still find race equality conversations in the VCS taking place without any black or Asian people present.

In the VCS the conversation shifted to discussions about the distribution of opportunities, the distribution of resources and the control of those resources. Whilst this is not the first time these issues had been considered it did feel for the first time that there was a cross-sector impetus, and more people are demanding more from their own leaders and organisations.

For much of the last thirty years [some] national VCS leaders engaged in discussions about racial inequalities but did not improve their own organisational performance. Equalities policies were adopted but there was no change in the ethnicity of those making decisions.

Young black, Asian and white people have demonstrated for change and are rightly rejecting tokenistic change in the VCS. It has been difficult, traumatic and uncomfortable, but it has provided a sense of hope that there will be change.

The issue of institutional racism has re-emerged with the usual denials that it exists in many large organisations. Structurally it would be easy to say that race equality never really featured in the core policy conversations within the VCS and, at best, it was a marginal issue often characterised with tokenistic gestures, e.g., the lone black or Asian individual employed to deliver the time limited ‘ethnic minority’ project.

In 2020 black and Asian colleagues in the VCS sector have demanded change. I think there are white leaders in the VCS that are prepared to listen and change their behaviour. They are prepared to use their influence and levers to tackle racial inequality. But there are leaders in large or influential organisations who are oblivious to the need for any change in the VCS. We all need to challenge and support these leaders to do better.

The conversation in some parts of the VCS has not changed – race equality is still not discussed. In other parts of the VCS what has changed is that the treatment of black people has been elevated up the management agenda. However, there is a risk that many white colleagues and leaders in the VCS view this as a moment and not the start of a transformation process.

Charitable trusts have also come under pressure to look at themselves and the equity of grant making decisions. Some have embraced this and have had a serious look at their organisation cultures, ethnic representation, and their relationship with black, Asian and minority ethnic organisations. Charitable trusts also have the lever of their grant making and must use this to drive change in the charities they support.

Government too has its procurement lever but has been reluctant to drive change. Large charities receive millions of pounds per year to provide public services and they should be held to account for bringing about change. For too long they have been dismissive of the need to reflect the ethnic diversity of their service users within their hierarchy. All too often black and Asian organisations have been excluded from the real decision making.

Today more importance is being placed on intersectional considerations – black and Asian individuals want to be respected and treated fairly for all their characteristics and not only in relation to ethnicity and colour. Black and Asian communities are demanding that they are not treated as a one-dimensional monolithic group.

We must be careful not to aid an inclination among leaders in the VCS to state the race equality box has been ticked now – “we’ve reviewed our policies so let’s move on now”.

Jeremy Crook OBE

RobBRob Berkley, Director of the Runnymede Trust, explains why they are working to end racism this generation.

Over the last weeks we have witnessed commemoration of the March on Washington, the high-point of the US civil rights movement. A timely reminder of the difference that movements can make, but also a challenge to this generation to take action to end injustice. In 2013, racism is still a problem which pervades our society. Since our inception in 1968 Runnymede has been fighting to achieve race equality in the UK. We’ve done this through research, network building, and policy engagement. But recently, we’ve been feeling as if this isn’t enough. Race equality seems to have been filed in the ‘too difficult’ box. In order for discrimination to stop, the struggle against racism needs to be part of the public consciousness. We need to change our approach; we need everybody to not just feel that racism is not good for society, but to act to eliminate it.

Although the Equalities Act 2010 protects ethnic minorities from racial discrimination, your ethnic background still significantly impacts your life chances. In education, if you are from a Black Caribbean background you are three times more likely to be excluded from school, and data revealed by the BBC shows that 87,915 racist incidents were recorded between 2007 and 2011 in British schools. After school, youth unemployment is experienced by one in five white men, but one in two young black men. When seeking work you will have to send out 78% more job applications if you have a ‘foreign sounding’ name. On the street, you will be 7 times more likely to be stopped and searched if you are black than your white counterparts, and 2 times more likely if you are Asian. In health, black and Asian people with dementia are less likely to receive a diagnosis or receive it at a later stage than their white British counterparts. Chillingly, 106 people have been killed in racist and suspected racist attacks since Stephen Lawrence’s death in 1993.

It is everybody’s responsibility to change this. Racism is a product of society and as a society we have the power to end it. It can be solved, if we work together. We believe that it everybody makes changes in their own lives, workplaces and communities, we can cause a fundamental shift where treating people equally and accepting difference will become the norm.

This September we are launching ‘End Racism This Generation’, a movement to end racism in the UK. The key to its success will be informing people about the continued existence of racism and the damage it causes to all of us, and sharing knowledge of what works in combating it.
Fighting for racial equality is everyone’s business. End Racism This Generation will create an online platform where those who want to make change can gather, learn, and create new networks for change. We will also be hosting events all around England and Wales to connect people together and spread the message.

People will be able to pledge the action they plan to take on the End Racism This Generation website. Their pledges will be mapped by area, which will allow individuals, organisations and businesses to see what is going on around them. It will present the opportunity for people to create partnerships to end racism. Crucially, these pledges will inspire others to take actions, and show what works.

We want the pledges to be non-restrictive, no action is too small, no pledge too insignificant. We want everybody to feel empowered to end racism, regardless of the resources at their disposal. A pledge could simply be to find out more about racism in the UK or to spread the word on how to tackle it through social networks. On a larger scale, organisations could pledge to show how their work already reduces racial inequality or use the momentum of the campaign to launch new activities. Businesses can pledge to work harder to ensure employees reflect the make up of the population at all levels of the business, including the boardroom. Schools and universities can pledge to take action in ensuring equality of educational experience for its minority ethnic students. And everybody can support the campaign by a donation, by giving money, time or offering the resources at their disposal.

We want this collective action to signal a shared commitment to work towards a Britain without racism; a Britain which accepts differences between people but treats them equally in all aspects of their lives. No one person, or organisation can achieve this by themselves but together we can end it.

 

You can find out more about the campaign on the Runnymede Trust’s website, on Twitter and on Facebook.